IS IT CAUSE I’M FATThe mind is a funny thing sometimes. We get so worked up about social recognition to trigger the reward centres in our brains and feel like we’ve done a good job. It happens all too often, be it with your boss at work, your school work and sadly sometimes even your hobbies. We all scrutinise to the point of no return all hoping to hear nothing but a few words of acknowledgement from people who may or may not even give a hoot. The popular analogy of dangling the carrot with the stick comes to mind. Unfortunately, this problem does more to hinder the hard work and effort we put in trying to achieve whichever task we put in front of us. In terms of healthy living and weight loss, not getting the recognition for our effort can kill the buzz you’ve been able to sustain for months on end trying to improve your health and for some, this is not only demoralising but also discourages you from wanting that effort in ever again. The people over at Gizmodo said it best, “For many people, a decision to lose weight isn’t just made because of the obvious health advantages, but to change the way people think about them.” What researchers at the University of Hawaii, The University of Manchester, and Monash University have found is that even when people do lose weight and try to turn their lives around, it does little to change the minds of friends or family. They were able to explain their results, published in the journal Obesity:
“Those who had been obese in the past were perceived as less attractive than those who had always been thin, despite having identical height and weight. The findings demonstrate that residual obesity stigma persists against individuals who have ever been obese, even when they have lost substantial amounts of weight.” 
I’ve witnessed this anti-fat prejudice and much like what the research pointed to, the belief that weight is highly controllable is what society hangs onto. Evidence towards this notion, both for and against is widely available but with that said, the negative connotations of excess weight is obvious. We get bombarded with what society thinks is sexy and beautiful everyday and living up to these falsified standards is trying to fill a bottomless glass.The key to breaking away from this trap, other than living peacefully in a remote corner of this planet, far removed from any and every form of socially infiltrated media, is to love yourself through every peak and trough. We all want to look and feel better with ourselves and our progress in whatever it may be, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. That can never be possible if we don’t learn to satisfy the biggest sceptic of them all…. yourself.Love your body. Spark on :-)

IS IT CAUSE I’M FAT

The mind is a funny thing sometimes. We get so worked up about social recognition to trigger the reward centres in our brains and feel like we’ve done a good job. It happens all too often, be it with your boss at work, your school work and sadly sometimes even your hobbies. We all scrutinise to the point of no return all hoping to hear nothing but a few words of acknowledgement from people who may or may not even give a hoot. The popular analogy of dangling the carrot with the stick comes to mind. 

Unfortunately, this problem does more to hinder the hard work and effort we put in trying to achieve whichever task we put in front of us. In terms of healthy living and weight loss, not getting the recognition for our effort can kill the buzz you’ve been able to sustain for months on end trying to improve your health and for some, this is not only demoralising but also discourages you from wanting that effort in ever again. 

The people over at Gizmodo said it best, “For many people, a decision to lose weight isn’t just made because of the obvious health advantages, but to change the way people think about them.” What researchers at the University of Hawaii, The University of Manchester, and Monash University have found is that even when people do lose weight and try to turn their lives around, it does little to change the minds of friends or family. They were able to explain their results, published in the journal Obesity:

“Those who had been obese in the past were perceived as less attractive than those who had always been thin, despite having identical height and weight. The findings demonstrate that residual obesity stigma persists against individuals who have ever been obese, even when they have lost substantial amounts of weight.” 


I’ve witnessed this anti-fat prejudice and much like what the research pointed to, the belief that weight is highly controllable is what society hangs onto. Evidence towards this notion, both for and against is widely available but with that said, the negative connotations of excess weight is obvious. We get bombarded with what society thinks is sexy and beautiful everyday and living up to these falsified standards is trying to fill a bottomless glass.

The key to breaking away from this trap, other than living peacefully in a remote corner of this planet, far removed from any and every form of socially infiltrated media, is to love yourself through every peak and trough. We all want to look and feel better with ourselves and our progress in whatever it may be, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. That can never be possible if we don’t learn to satisfy the biggest sceptic of them all…. yourself.

Love your body. Spark on :-)